How to Make You Customer Interviews Succesful

How to Make You Customer Interviews Succesful

We all know how important is to assign time to have several customer interviews. You must understand what your potential customers gains, pains and jobs are in order to achieve the adequate product market fit. In this article we provide you quick tips we recommend you to have in mind by the time you start the customer development process. 1. Introduce yourself.   2. Make it casual but professional at the same time. If you are presenting, do it visual, not so much text is recommended. Customers or beneficiaries need to be paying attention to you. 3. Not pitch your product. You are just guessing product market fit, you have to get out of the building and turn your guesses into findings. 4. Assess the market opportunity, market competition & market type. 5. Find patterns, understand the answer of your customers in deep, what they are also trying to say to you? whats underneath their answer? 6. Talk to a significant amount of potential customers and beneficiaries. You want lots of data so you can get insights. 7. Get industry, market and customer insights. 8. Find early evangelists. If your MVP is virtual you can make a soft lunch and understand patterns and improve it when going back to the building. 9. Communicate your discoveries within your team so you are all aligned and think those findings are the right path to your...
João: Helping Brazilian youth discover their dreams

João: Helping Brazilian youth discover their dreams

“Discovering Young Dream,” or “Descobrindo o Sonho Jovem” (DSJ), encourages youth in Capão Redondo, Brazil, to pursue their passions, offering eight distinctive workshops to boost participants’ confidences and help them achieve personal and professional success. For João Araújo, DSJ is more than a business. Much like many of the teenagers who take part in the workshops, the 18-year-old grew up in Capão Redondo, a neighborhood that the United Nations considered one of the most dangerous places to live in the 1990s—the decade in which João was born. “People who live here generally don’t have a specific life purpose, and they don’t believe in their dreams. But I have always been a positive person,” João says. “Gustavo and I had the same perception about people who lived there, mainly young people who were pessimistic about their future. This bothered us, so we decided to do something about it.” Working with his high school friend Gustavo da Silva, 18, João established eight different workshops for youth. A typical DSJ program runs over eight weeks, offering one workshop each week. The four key pillars of the two month-long program include self-awareness, dreaming big, planning and putting ideas into action. Starting with self-awareness of the participant’s capabilities, the program provides an interactive methodology and a safe environment to inspire youth to share their aspirations and ultimately, create a plan to put their ideas into motion. Asking participants to complete one evaluation at the beginning of the program and one at the end, DSJ attempts to track the overall success rate of the workshops. For João, the most rewarding part is the positive feedback...

Can Redefining Humanity be Professor Yunus Legacy?

Professor Muhammad Yunus has already transformed global financial systems and made his mark on development, but at 75 he’s not done yet. What he’s working to do now, what he hopes will be his legacy, is changing what he calls an “artificial” and “distorted” construct of human beings that the world has created, Yunus, the co-founder and chairman of Yunus Social Business Global Initiatives, told Devex in an exclusive interview in Kampala, Uganda, last week. “I hope that people will rediscover themselves — that they are not just robots to make money, that they have tremendous hunger for doing things for others,” he said. “All I’m saying is look guy, you have this inside of you — check all your pockets, somewhere it’s there.” This way of thinking that is both empowering but also looks to the greater good must begin at a young age — both at home and in schools, he said. Children should not only be told that if they follow a certain path they’ll end up as the CEO of a big company, but they should also be told that they can be job creators and change the world rather than working for others. That way of thinking “has to be integrated in the life process,” Yunus said. “Today I’m bringing it from the outside so it’s been difficult.” That ideology also has to permeate the development community, which he said is still based on the idea of the limited power of human beings. “The mold of charity because that’s the only thing they can do because either they’ll work for somebody or somebody has...

Muhammad Yunus on How to Change the World: Do the Reverse

Muhammad Yunus is the founder of Grameen Bank, the pioneering Dhaka-based organization that spread microcredit and microfinance globally. Professor Yunus was awarded the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize for his transformative impact. Ashoka had a chance to catch up with him just before the 2016 World Economic Forum. Interviewer: You’ve been a global defining force in several spheres, including microcredit and more recently, social business. What’s got your attention right now? Professor Yunus: We’re in a moment of tremendous change — not linear but exponential — and we need to bring our society through a transition process to one of more evenly distributed wealth and power. This is summed up in my three focus areas that are foundational to everything else: zero poverty, zero unemployment, and zero net carbon emissions. Within this, I’m drilling down on unemployment and wealth concentration. We all know that the world’s wealth is controlled by a handful of people. More worrying is the speed at which wealth is further concentrating. Today we are talking about the one percent. Tomorrow it will be half a percent, then one-tenth, and so on. This is totally disastrous, so we need to work quickly to undo the harmful things that are reflected in our economic framework and move toward a new, more selflesscivilization. So I am spending time sharing how to achieve this and what role new frameworks in social business and education can play. Interviewer: How does zero unemployment happen? Professor Yunus: This is built into microcredit and demonstrated by 8.5 million borrowers in Bangladesh and some 140 million globally. Most are women — some are successful entrepreneurs, others are struggling entrepreneurs. Regardless, this...